Monday, October 10th, 2011

What’s on TV?

Stephanie

We spend about a hundred dollars a month on Direct TV. We have two televisions, (one which never gets watched) and one which has a DVR hooked up to it. Do you know that for $8 a month you can watch TV online from Netflix? or Amazon.com? I know a lot of people who have disconnected their cable and are watching online – and I would too if I could. But my husband can’t seem to live without watching baseball, football, and golf. (To me, watching golf on TV is like watching paint dry but I still love him.)

And though I have the DVR recording a good 25+ shows, I think I could manage without them. I barely watch TV except when I eat and sometimes at night. I just like having shows I want to watch rather than flipping through the channels. Infomercials. Ugh. {Shudders}

In my book of lists, I have written down some of my favorite TV shows over the years. Sitcoms, dramas & cartoons – but they don’t seem to make TV like they used to. My list these days would show a lot of reality television- and yes, I still watch Survivor. Though I sort of promised I’d give it up if Boston Rob finally won the million which he did last season. But here I am again, watching season 227 on the island… and speaking of Boston Rob, he’s got a goofy new show on the History Channel called, “Around the World in 80 Ways” which yes… I have set to record. (Because I have a secret crush on him)

So tell me, do you still watch television?


14 thoughts on “What’s on TV?

  1. We pulled the plug on the cable, finally, about two months ago because we simply don’t watch broadcast TV any more. We do watch a few series, but get those either via streaming (Netflix or the ‘Zon) or on DVDs, either purchased or through Netflix. Many of the things people cite as excellent programming are available through alternate means; we’re just looking into Hulu+ now. Hubby isn’t into organized sports (yes, I know, he’s probably the only man in existence that isn’t) so we didn’t have the ESPN withdrawal issues that some might.

    Saving ourselves $60 a month for discontinuing something we didn’t use is fine. We have a set of rabbit ears we can hook up to the HDTV to get all the local stations as desired, and the picture quality is markedly better than the cable picture ever was – plus it’s free. Nice!

  2. We pulled the plug on the cable, finally, about two months ago because we simply don’t watch broadcast TV any more. We do watch a few series, but get those either via streaming (Netflix or the ‘Zon) or on DVDs, either purchased or through Netflix. Many of the things people cite as excellent programming are available through alternate means; we’re just looking into Hulu+ now. Hubby isn’t into organized sports (yes, I know, he’s probably the only man in existence that isn’t) so we didn’t have the ESPN withdrawal issues that some might.

    Saving ourselves $60 a month for discontinuing something we didn’t use is fine. We have a set of rabbit ears we can hook up to the HDTV to get all the local stations as desired, and the picture quality is markedly better than the cable picture ever was – plus it’s free. Nice!

  3. UK TV is pretty dire and is taxed at over £100 per year … they call it a BBC ‘licence fee’ and you get banged up if you don’t pay. Main satellite provider costs up to £50 per month. Most programmes are trash. However, our radio services are good, so I’d rather listen and read your blogs, using TV only for news headlines on CNN!

  4. UK TV is pretty dire and is taxed at over £100 per year … they call it a BBC ‘licence fee’ and you get banged up if you don’t pay. Main satellite provider costs up to £50 per month. Most programmes are trash. However, our radio services are good, so I’d rather listen and read your blogs, using TV only for news headlines on CNN!

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