Monday, April 5th, 2010

What would you do with lighting bug ink?

Stephanie

Uh-oh,  I guess I should add a disclaimer that the ink isn’t actually made out of lightning bugs….

Exaclair will be debuting this new J. Herbin Phosphorescente ink at the upcoming National Stationery Show in New York City, May 16th-19th at the Javits Center.

Karen told me that this ink is meant to “glow like a firefly’s belly” and that it does! It is not an ink for fountain pens, so break out the dip pens for this one. And I’m certain you can guess what I did with it the minute I got it, right? Glow-in-the-dark mandala? You betcha! Now I just have to figure out how to take a picture of the results!

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18 thoughts on “What would you do with lighting bug ink?

  1. when I was a kid, back in the 1960s, I collected phosphorescent toys and paints including the Green Ghost game, SuperBalls, and plastic stars. I had several bottles of a product from Kenner Toys called “Lightning Bug Glow Juice,” a gesso-like substance with suspended particles of glow-stuff. I painted tarot symbols and portraits of The Beatles on the ceilings of many friends’ bedrooms. I used my last bottle of Glow Juice in 1975 to paint lines on a stage so the crew could place set pieces in the dark.

    Note the difference between “fluorescent” — UV active reflectance, and “phosphorescent” — self-energized light emission. Particles of phosph. material are quite large, relatively speaking. the bigger they are and the more of them , the brighter the effect and the longer it lasts.
    If you shine an ultraviolet source on phosph. material it will light up intensely. In your case, your mandala inks may react to the UV by fluorescing in stunning and surprising colors. The pigments in some inks are remarkably UV-reactive.

    david boise ID

  2. when I was a kid, back in the 1960s, I collected phosphorescent toys and paints including the Green Ghost game, SuperBalls, and plastic stars. I had several bottles of a product from Kenner Toys called “Lightning Bug Glow Juice,” a gesso-like substance with suspended particles of glow-stuff. I painted tarot symbols and portraits of The Beatles on the ceilings of many friends’ bedrooms. I used my last bottle of Glow Juice in 1975 to paint lines on a stage so the crew could place set pieces in the dark.

    Note the difference between “fluorescent” — UV active reflectance, and “phosphorescent” — self-energized light emission. Particles of phosph. material are quite large, relatively speaking. the bigger they are and the more of them , the brighter the effect and the longer it lasts.
    If you shine an ultraviolet source on phosph. material it will light up intensely. In your case, your mandala inks may react to the UV by fluorescing in stunning and surprising colors. The pigments in some inks are remarkably UV-reactive.

    david boise ID

  3. Wow, what a fun idea! What would I do with it… hmmm, thinking back to my rather geeky youth (that has become confidently geeky adulthood :) ), this would have been THE coolest thing to fiddle with. Agatha Christie meets James Bond and Sherlock Holmes all in one bottle!

    I would actually use it as a way to introduce certain kids who had the bent toward this sort of thing to the joy of using a dip pen. There are still those kids who find that fascinating while also zipping along with more modern tech.

  4. Wow, what a fun idea! What would I do with it… hmmm, thinking back to my rather geeky youth (that has become confidently geeky adulthood :) ), this would have been THE coolest thing to fiddle with. Agatha Christie meets James Bond and Sherlock Holmes all in one bottle!

    I would actually use it as a way to introduce certain kids who had the bent toward this sort of thing to the joy of using a dip pen. There are still those kids who find that fascinating while also zipping along with more modern tech.

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