Monday, March 19th, 2007

Confessions of a Bookplate Junkie

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    Every once in a while I get a bookplate that makes me wonder about the owner.

    Such is the case with the bookplate for James Allan.
    My assumption is that James Allan was sent to do the work of God in Africa, before the days of political correctness. He had a friend ,H.T. Church , who designed his bookplate as a gift.

    In this instance, Google has not been the shining light I have come to expect and none of my reference books mentions an H .F. Church

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Lew Jaffe has been collecting bookplates for over twenty-five years. The blog is chockful of pages from his personal collection as well as links to resources on bookplate collecting. He even shares his passion, showing you how to remove your a bookplate and sharing his tips for new collectors.

Visit his blog

All images taken from his blog. All rights reserved.


5 thoughts on “Confessions of a Bookplate Junkie

  1. My search on Mary Emily Wortman lead me to your site. I have a small book by her, published in 1920 about her trip to Angkor Wat. I was trying to find out more about her life, since that type of trip in the 1920s must have been unusual, especially for a woman. Looking at her bookplate leads me to believe she was quite a traveler. Do you have any information about her?

  2. Inside the cover of my Dad’s physics book, he had affixed a bookplate with a wonderfully ornate art deco border, centered within which was the customary “Ex Libris” and his name. It looked like some small printing shop had printed his name using hot or moveable type onto pre-printed stock, and I thought it looked way cool.

    I have always thought it would be a good idea to put bookplates in my books, and have been cooking an idea for one in my head for perhaps thirty years. It seems a respectful way to increase the likelihood of a lent book coming home again. So far I have lost two sets of “The Lord of the Rings” (very pre-movie) and one of “War and Peace”.

    Thanks for the post and for the link to Lewis’s blog. I had no idea that bookplates were of so much interest to anybody! Wow.

  3. Inside the cover of my Dad’s physics book, he had affixed a bookplate with a wonderfully ornate art deco border, centered within which was the customary “Ex Libris” and his name. It looked like some small printing shop had printed his name using hot or moveable type onto pre-printed stock, and I thought it looked way cool.

    I have always thought it would be a good idea to put bookplates in my books, and have been cooking an idea for one in my head for perhaps thirty years. It seems a respectful way to increase the likelihood of a lent book coming home again. So far I have lost two sets of “The Lord of the Rings” (very pre-movie) and one of “War and Peace”.

    Thanks for the post and for the link to Lewis’s blog. I had no idea that bookplates were of so much interest to anybody! Wow.

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